The Nokes Review

Manolo says, the Academics have finally gotten their hands on the Manolo’s short work The Consolation of the Shoes, here is part of the Professor Nokes’s review.

The honest truth is that I thought the whole thing was a hoax. Manolo the Shoeblogger had, supposedly, written a book called The Consolation of Shoes, an obvious parody (homage?) to Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy. It even had an introduction by the deliciously over-the-top character Herr Professor Doktor Boethius von Korncrake.

Then Manolo sent me a *.pdf copy of his book, and I’ll be darned if it isn’t a real thing: a book-length version of Boethius’s Consolation, except with shoes.

But wait, there is more.

But I think the modern relative obscurity of Boethius prevents The Consolation of Shoes from being dangerous in its nihilism, and keeps it good fun. After all, the only people who would know Boethius well enough to get the joke are, well, people who know Boethius. If you have already read Boethius, then you have been confronted intellectually with the question of what is important in life, so Manolo isn’t presenting you with any ideas that you weren’t already familiar with.

OK, ok, so this review has been a lot more serious than perhaps a light-hearted piece like Manolo the Shoeblogger’s The Consolation of Shoes calls for. If you know your Boethius, it is very funny, with several laugh-out-loud moments. I would highly recommend it for anyone toiling away at serious Boethius scholarship. Go ahead, give your mind a break, and let it dangle its toes in the sparkling stream that is The Consolation of Shoes.

You must go read the whole thing, as the Manolo found the review incredibly amusing.

2 Responses to “The Nokes Review”

  1. aimlessjoys June 14, 2007 at 10:50 am #

    He obviously did not notice the brilliant allusion to profound/obscure/rather obtuse academician a la Nabokov. Heheheh!

  2. e June 14, 2007 at 11:28 am #

    …well, had you read Boethius like me, then you are clever enough to get the Manolo’s joke….

    Oh, academia, why must you insist on emphasising how well-read you are?