Manolo the Columnist: Carmella Wedge from Elie Tahari

Manolo says, here is the Manolo’s latest column for the Express of the Washington Post.

Dear Manolo,

Your recent column in which you mentioned the trend for barefoot brides and bridesmaids has struck a chord with me. My son is getting married in May, to a wonderful if somewhat quirky girl. Not only are they going to be married out of doors, at a friend’s farm in Northern Virginia, but the entire wedding party will be barefooted. I would rather not be barefooted, as I grew up on a farm and know a thing or two about them. My dress will be a simple linen shift in a pale blue, please suggest some shoes appropriate for the clothes and setting.

Angie.

Manolo says, the Manolo’s friend is right to be apprehensive about her son getting married with the bare feets, in the Appalachian foothills, out by the hog troughs. (And here the Manolo will forebear to make the jokes about chittlin canapés and moonshine toasts given by the best man.)

In fact, the Manolo is at the stage now where he applauds any young couple who opt out of the mega-marriage madness, events that can consume many tens of thousands of dollars in unnecessary wedding folderol. Better the smaller, good-humored celebration filled with love, family, and friends. Such joys cannot be purchased at any price.

Here is the Carmella Wedge from Elie Tahari, understated and elegantly casual.

Carmella Wedge from Elie Tahari

4 Responses to “Manolo the Columnist: Carmella Wedge from Elie Tahari”

  1. Lisa the Knitter April 16, 2010 at 9:57 am #

    You’ve done it again, Manolo. Genius.

  2. Vicki April 16, 2010 at 12:10 pm #

    The Tahari sandals are lovely but wouldn’t Blundstones suit the setting better?

  3. Iris Celeste April 16, 2010 at 6:45 pm #

    Sorry, don’t like, totally unsuitable. Try this

  4. Phyllis April 17, 2010 at 7:47 am #

    No wedges are better, heels sink into soft grass (ask me how I know this) Alhtough northern Vriginia these days is about a rural as Queens and any farming that happens is more like Mount Vernon than homesteading.