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The Edwardian Bill Cunningham

Edwardian Street Fashion

Manolo says, from the Best Newspaper in the World, comes the remarkable series of photographs, taken by Edward Linley Sambourne, the turn of the last century photographer who seems to have pioneered street fashion photography.

Street blogging may be considered to be a modern phenomenon, but a series of images unearthed by Kensington and Chelsea Libraries prove that the practice may date as far back as the early 1900’s.

The Library service has published several wonderful images by the late amateur photographer Edward Linley Sambourne, who was also the chief cartoonist for Punch, which give an amazing insight into the street style of the woman of London and Paris over a century ago.

Sambourne’s beautiful street photography captures the casual side of Edwardian fashion in a manner which is rarely seen

As the Manolo says, the photographs, taken in London and Paris in the first decade of the 20th Century are remarkable in their unstudied candor and casualness.

Edwardian Street Fashion

Look, she has the bicycle, just like in the Sartorialist!

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Manolo’s Thursday Miscellany

Manolo says, here are the few things which may help you past the idle moment…

They’re a bit Advanced Fashion so potentially not for the average user, although I honestly don’t think they’re as tough to pull off as most people think.

There are some written medieval sources on possible female breast support, but they are rather vague on the topic.

The manifestation of that may change from day to day, but the elements of joyful dressing for me are Movement, Color (not necessarily *vivid* color), Harmony, and just a bit of Edge.

Four Seymour Troy Shoes

Manolo says, At the Manolo’s Pinterest, he has been pinning many pictures of the historical shoes, and so now he wishes to share with you some of the things that have caught his fancy, in this case, the shoes of the Seymour Troy, one of the first famous America fashion shoe designers, famous starting in the 1920s and continuing on through the early 1960s.

Seymour Troy Button Strape Suede Pump

The first shoe, above, is this dramatic Seymour Troy button-strap suede pump, dated to the circa 1929. To the Manolo, this shoe looks totally wearable in the present day, and is probably more comfortable than you would imagine.

Seymour Troy Rhinestone Sandal

Here is the Seymour Troy rhinestone pump from 1933, ayyyy! Super fantastic!

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From the Archives of the Manolo: Metropolitan Railway Boots, 1916

N.B. Unfortunately, the interwebs at the Casa Manolo were not working for much the morning, and thus your humble shoeblogger got the late start on the day, and so, by way of entertainment, here is something good from his archives, originally posted on the January 7, 2011. Be certain to visit the original post and read the spirited discussion in the comments.

Female Conductor on the Metropolitan Railway, 1916

The Female Guard on the Metropolitan Railway in 1916

Manolo says, the Manolo loves these boots on the English railway guard lady, so feminine and flattering, indeed, the entire costume is most super fantastic!

From the site of London Transport Museum

During the First World War, the Metropolitan Railway, like other services serving the City, was effectively taken over by the government. Its trains were extensively used to transport troops from London to the Channel ports. To replace its employees who left to fight, the Met began employing women for the first time in positions such as porters, ticket inspectors, and guards.

Here is another picture of these boots and uniform on the different woman…

Female Guard on the Metropolitan Railway, During World War One

Female Guard on the Metropolitan Railway

Those boots!

And now, the modern comparison….

And here is where the century of progress has left us: women who are doing the jobs perceived as masculine are forced to cross dress in the masculine costumes, as if one cannot be both womanly and the railway conductor at the same time.

André Perugia Pumps

Andre Perugia Shoes from the 1920s

Manolo says, here for your midday shoe-viewing enjoyment are the embroidered red and black pumps from the master shoe maestro, André Perugia, shoes which currently reside in the Kyoto Costume Institute.

Gorgeous!

P.S. If you like looking at the historic clothing you should go to this blog, OMG That Dress, from which this photo comes, and follow the Manolo on the Pinterest.

Manolo’s Thursday Miscellany

Manolo says, here are the few things which may intrigue…

Writing frumpy, lumpy prose is the equivalent of showing up on a first date with unwashed hair and dirty clothes, and then talking about yourself in a way that leaves the other person looking at her watch and remembering she has to do laundry.
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For my part, I consider the state of the bride’s hymen to fall firmly into the ‘none of my business, so please don’t share with me’ category.
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Vintage in Museum Archives & from Couture Auction Houses

Five Regency Gowns

Manolo says, the Manolo, who has just this past week joined the Pinterest, has been thoroughly enjoying himself, acting like the curious, acquisitive crow, gathering up various things that catch his eye, and nothing has been more catching of the eye, than the photos of the historical clothing.

Here, then, are five photos of Regency gowns (all dating from 1810 to 1820, and in various museums and collections around the world) that the Manolo has gathered together and now wishes to show you.

Empire Waisted, Regency GownEmpire Waisted, Regency GownEmpire Waisted, Regency GownEmpire Waisted, Regency GownEmpire Waisted, Regency Gown

Such marvelous fun!

The yellow gowns went in and out of fashion throughout the period, and the Manolo remembers the passage from Susan Edmonstone Ferrier’s 1818 novel, Marriage, in which one of the most wonderfully awful characters, Mrs May Gawffaw, wears the yellow silk gown.

Mrs Gawffaw was the daughter of a trader in some manufacturing town, who had lived in opulence and died insolvent. During his life, his daughter had eloped with Bob Gawffaw, then a gay lieutenant in a marching regiment, who had been briefly esteemed a very lucky fellow in getting the pretty Miss Croaker, with the prospect of ten thousand pounds. None thought more highly of her husband’s good fortune than the lady herself; and though her fortune never was realised, she gave herself all the airs of having been the making of his. At this time, Mr Gawffaw was a reduced lieutenant, living upon a small paternal property, which he pretended to farm; but the habits of military life, joined to a naturally social disposition, were rather inimical to the pursuits of agriculture, and most of his time was spent in loitering about the village of G____, where he generally contrived to either pick up a guest or procure a dinner.

Mrs Gawffaw despised her husband–had weak nerves and headaches–was above managing her house–read novels–dyed ribands–and altered her gowns according to every pattern she could see or hear of.

Such were Mr and Mrs Gawffaw; one of many ill-assorted couples in this world–joined, not matched. A sensible man would have curbed her folly and peevishness: a good-tempered woman would have made his home comfortable, and rendered him more domestic.

[...]

May’s reply consisted in putting her hands to her head, with an air of inexpressible vexation; and finding all her endeavours to be elegant frustrated by the overpowering vulgarity of her husband, she remained silent during the remainder of the repast; solacing herself with complacent glances at her yellow silk gown, and adjusting the gold chains and necklaces that adorned her bosom.

Such brilliant writing! The Manolo had almost forgotten about the very funny and perceptive Susan Ferrier, the writer whose world will thankfully never be invaded by zombies and sea-monsters.

Her Majesty’s A Pretty Nice Girl

Queen Elizabeth, the New Look, 1954

Manolo says, here, from the Vanity Fair photo retrospective of Elizabethan hats, comes the most shocking photo ever of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

It is 1954, and in Australia for one, brief, glorious moment, the Queen is perfectly au courant. She is not the redoubtable, middle-class matron who visits hospitals and endures the antics of her louche children, but rather the stunningly-attired, 28-year-old, semi-hotty.

Everything about this is exactly perfect, from the hat to the shoes, from the gloves to the lace. This is the example of how the woman who has not been granted great beauty, can none-the-less become mesmerizing through the use of beautiful clothing and proper carriage.

Happy Bloomsday!

Manolo quotes,

Her shoes were the newest thing in footwear (Edy Boardman prided herself that she was very petite but she never had a foot like Gerty MacDowell, a five, and never would ash, oak or elm) with patent toecaps and just one smart buckle at her higharched instep.

Bloomsday, we are informed, was June 16th, 1904, thus we wonder, what sort of shoes might our Gerty MacDowell have been wearing?

Shoes 1905

From 1905, these dainty, pumps give you the idea of what was the fancy fashion at that moment.

More work-a-day, from the same period, is this 1905 advertisement below for the Sorosis Safe Shoe.

Sorois Safe Shoes, 1905

Notice the patent toe cap.

Young Billionaires, Then and Now

Then: The Young Howard Hughes…

Young Howard Hughes, so dashing!

Ayyyy! So dashing!

Now: The Young Mark Zuckerberg…

Who says that glamour is dead?

Manolo says, it is the shower shoes that really bring the ensemble together.

The Cardboard Art of Christian Tagliavini

Manolo says, why has no one until now told the Manolo about the work of the photographer Christian Tagliavini?

Christian Tagliavinis Dame di Cartone

It is so wonderfully amusing, and made out of the cardboard.

Taking 13 months to complete, 1503 is largely inspired by the masters of the Renaissance, notably Agnolo di Cosimo (usually known as ‘Il Bronzino’) who was born in the same year as the title. Using cardboard & paper in place of material allows Tagliavini to design each item from the patterning to the final construction of form completely. In his series Dame Di Cartone (literal translation: ‘Cardboard Ladies’) several influences from art history & other eras are again present resulting in striking imagery.

From beginning to completion Tagliavini’s work is a labour of love. He admits that he enjoys the process as much as the resulting photograph, constructing an aesthetic from scratch he feels is incredibly satisfying from a creative & philosophical point of view. With as much done in situ as possible, including the illusory lengthening of the neck Tagliavini reduces the amount of postproduction needed thus retaining the immediacy of the image beautifully.

Christian Tagliavini Cardboard Ladies

Both striking and delightful!

One Hundred Years of London Style

Manolo says, the internets occasionally bring us wonderful and wonderfully amusing things, such as this video below…

Not always, but more than once in this montage, not only can the Manolo tell you what year is being portrayed but what month!

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